Interviews

Meet Jason Lee Norman: Canadian!

Jason 11Nancy and I are excited that writer, editor, and publisher Jason Lee Norman will be joining us for Rendezvous in the Rockies, our 2nd Colorado retreat. Jason recently took the time to have a quick chat with me.

KF: Hi Jason! Have you visited Colorado before?

JLN: I have not been to Colorado before. Not even the airport. Never had a Denver omelet.

KF: You are in for a treat. And Denver omelets are great! Tell me, what do you most look forward to at our retreat at Shadowcliff Mountain Lodge?

JLN: I’m really looking forward to meeting you and Nancy and learning from you both. It will be an honor. It’s been a long time since I’ve taken time away to devote to my own writing so doing so at this beautiful spot in the mountains will be time well spent I’m sure.

KF: It’s a lovely place to rest and commune with nature and hopefully get a lot of writing done. So, as a reader, what sorts of stories do you find yourself drawn to?

JLN: I’m really loving flash fiction right now. I love these stories that can be so brief and pack such a punch. Generally I love stories that try a lot of the things that is attempted in flash fiction. Usually it’s just a unusual premise that the writer has to keep upright as long as possible like a surfer riding an enormous wave.

KF: That’s a perfect comparison. I love that. And what is one favorite story of your own?

JLN: What a question! I have a soft spot for a few stories for sure. One that I haven’t checked in on in awhile is called Beautiful Girls. I sent it to PANK and they published it online forever ago. Even in 2011 I knew that it meant a lot to get a compliment on your story from Roxane Gay. It’s sustained me for nearly a decade now. I can’t believe it was that long ago. I’ve written good stories since then. I promise!

KF: Terrific story. No wonder Roxane snapped it up. That’s definitely something to feel good about. Is there something about you that you’d like to share that is surprising/funny/endearing/strange whatever? 

JLN: Well I haven’t told anybody this one thing about me in a long time but I’m Canadian, eh?

KF: Wow, that’s the weirdest answer we’ve ever gotten to that question!

Thanks so much, Jason! See you this August in Grand Lake!

 Jason Lee Norman publishes Monto Books and edits Funicular Magazine. He writes and eats in Edmonton, Canada. 

 

Note: Spaces still remain for Rendezvous in the Rockies, Part II! Join us!

 

Interviews

Writing Wild in Costa Rica: An Interview with Participant Corey Miller

Writer and brewer Corey Miller is joining us for Write Wild in Costa Rica in a few short weeks! Here, Corey shares a little bit about himself and what he’s looking forward to on our retreat.
KF: Hi Corey! Can you share with us a little bit about your writing life?

CM: I began writing during college in my free time. I enjoy writing short stories that can quickly envelope the reader but still leave much to the imagination.

KF: What are you most looking forward to in Costa Rica?

CM: I can’t wait to explore the area and get out of my comfort zone. I think a change of pace will spark some new creativeness.
KF: Sparking creativity is certainly one of our goals for this retreat! Now: One book, one meal, one song…go! 
 

CM: The Giver by Lois Lowry, grilled cheese and tomato soup, PYT by Michael Jackson

KF: Ah, great answers. Would you like to share with us something unusual or interesting or weird or wonderful about yourself?
CM: I went to college for music but brew beer as a job. Oh, and I live in a tiny house I built.
KF: Oh that’s so cool! I love the “jungle cabinas” at our venue in Peace Retreat. Like tiny houses! Thanks so much, Corey. Really looking forward to meeting you and working (and retreating) with you in Costa Rica next month! 
Note: Our Costa Rica Retreat is filled, but openings remain for our upcoming retreats in Italy and Grand Lake. Check them out!

Bio: Corey Miller works and writes in Cleveland, OH. When not writing, Corey takes the dogs for a hike and enjoys cooking for the family. 

 

Kathy fish, Writing Prompts & Craft Articles

A Remedy for When You’re Stuck: Inserting the Unexpected Detail

unexpectedOne of the many reasons we find ourselves getting “stuck” when drafting a new story is that we have unwittingly written ourselves into a very boring place. How did this happen? We had such a great idea!

The answer likely resides in your descriptions. 

Consider your “go-to” descriptions of settings and characters. What do you think of when you see the words “hospital room” for example?

“antiseptic” smells

the beeping monitors

a nurse in a “starched white uniform” (not sure they even wear those anymore!)

How about a waitress in a diner?

She’s wearing a name tag, of course. Maybe her name is Candy. She has a pencil behind her ear and she is chewing, no “smacking” a piece of gum. 

Do you see where I’m going with this? These descriptions write themselves. In the process of drafting, if you find yourself falling into these clichés, the rest of the writing will likely follow suit. You begin to bore yourself.

I urge you to make every single part of your flash fiction so fresh and new and interesting that your reader (or slush pile reader) sits up and takes notice from beginning to end. With fewer words at your disposal, the description you do include needs to be strong, palpable, and carry a lot of emotional or narrative weight.

With this in mind, you should also consider how you describe ordinary things. Can you look at those things with fresh eyes? In Susan Minot’s connected collection of stories, “Monkeys,” she shows a character plunking down a crumpled up napkin and saying that it “bloomed” on the table. Can you see that? I can and it’s perfect. What a thrilling, fresh description!

The following is an exercise I use in my online workshop, Fast Flash, and it always results in strong, fresh, original pieces of writing that surprise even the writers themselves. We writers need ways to overcome our natural tendency to write scenes in the way they have always been written. This exercise is designed to give you a new way in to your material.

I want you to imagine a scene in a commonplace setting. One you’ve seen in fiction many times. A hospital room, a bar, a dining room, a park, a school yard, whatever. No doubt your brain already conjures up certain images and descriptions just by reading those words.

Now, I want you to insert some unexpected detail. Don’t give this too much thought and don’t worry about making sense, just insert the strange detail.

Examples: a clown at the train station, a daisy growing out of the sidewalk, an old man walking backwards, an animal in a hospital room, etc. 

Perhaps the odd detail will drive the scene forward or perhaps it will remain in the background, but what this exercise does is trick your brain into writing a scene in that setting that has, I promise you, never been written before. You have given yourself permission to write outside the box. You have “primed the pump” of your subconscious and now all bets are off.

***Consider also describing something ordinary within your setting in an extraordinary way (like the napkin that “bloomed” in the Susan Minot story).

You might also try this on a story you’ve been stuck on! Have fun!

~Kathy

 

Nancy Stohlman

Brilliant New Collection by Nancy Stohlman: Madam Velvet’s Cabaret of Oddities

“Step right up and meet a woman so determined to be a star she’ll try anything, including spray on Instant Fame! Meet her reflection, who dreams of a life of her own and manages to find love on the Internet! See the man desperately trying to earn a world record in the most bizarre way possible! Learn the origins of the Four-Legged Woman and the Human Skeleton! Clown mothers, suicidal ringmasters, cult leader who teach the cha-cha and Alaska Jackson’s Traveling Medicine Show…each one takes center stage in this vaudeville of flash fiction. Flash fiction, microfiction, short-short stories… regardless of the name, it’s all the same—a compressed story that packs a punch. Enter a cabaret of the weird, the absurd, and the bizarre with this bold and bawdy new collection.”

Well, readers, I promise you this collection is like none other you’ve read and I’m thrilled that Nancy’s Madam Velvet’s Cabaret of Oddities, published by Big Table Publishing, releases to the world October 26th. This latest is “pure Stohlman,” as Pamela Painter so aptly puts it.

Told in a series of connected flashes (actually microfictions, some as brief as one sentence), this book tells the story of circus clowns and sideshow performers, with Nancy’s inimitable style and wit and what James Thomas describes as “brilliant performance art on the printed page.”

The pieces are so inventive and daring, with a voice that leaps off the page. Nancy deals with deep truths in a way that bucks straight realism. As she puts it, she feels most comfortable telling her stories “slant.” One of my favorites is this mind bender:

Future Self

I was backstage. The crowd was applauding. I peeked

through the heavy maroon curtains and there was my Future Self

in the spotlight. She saw me and her face opened like a flower to

the sun.

I walked on stage and sat next to her. Then I noticed I was

sitting in a chair labeled “Before” as the audience clapped and

whistled.

I love what Steven Dunn has to say about this collection:

“Nancy Stohlman’s writing is so damn sharp here. And each of these shards that make up Madam Velvet’s Cabaret of Oddities is connected by this silly-sad-hopeful-absurd-melancholic web that catches everything you do not want, and you’ll find yourself longing for what’s not caught. But you will end up caught in the web too, with all of that mess. I’ve never read a book like this, and I’m excited to hear all of the conversations surrounding it.” ​~Steven Dunn, author of Water and Power and Potted Meat

If you’re in the Denver area, why not treat yourself to the book’s official release and performance on Friday, October 26th at the Mercury Cafe ballroom? 

Read more about this collection in Nancy’s interview at Pen and Muse.

Watch the trailer!

 

Uncategorized

Cath Barton’s Award-Winning Novella, The Plankton Collector, Now Available!

Nancy and I are so excited that Cath Barton and her husband Oliver will be joining us at Palazzo Forani in Casperia for our Springtime in Italy retreat in May! Cath’s novella, The Plankton Collector, won the New Welsh Writing Award 2017: Novella Category. Congratulations, Cath!

I found Cath’s writing in this compelling and mysterious novella so rich and evocative. Here is an excerpt:

“No-one knows his name, or rather they know him by different names, depending on when and where they meet him. All he asks is to to be acknowledged and listened to but, like the plankton, he is a wanderer – though on land rather than in water – and is never in one place for long. He passes un- remarked in the crowd. He is the man at the next table in the café. The one drinking his morning coffee like any other. The one reading the newspaper. Or the one simply sitting and staring.”

Here is a description from the publisher, New Welsh Rarebyte:

“In this atmospheric novella, the mysterious Plankton Collector visits members of a family torn apart by grief and regret. he comes in different guises. For ten year-old Mary, he is Mr Smith who takes her on a train journey to the seaside. Her mother, Rose, meets him as Stephen, by her son’s graveside. Rose’s youngest, Bunny, encounters him as the gardener. For husband and father David, meanwhile, the meeting is with a love from his youth. And long-lost Uncle Barnaby takes the children for a week’s holiday during which their parents begin a reconciliation. All visitors are manifestations of the Plankton Collector who teaches those he encounters the difference between the discarded weight of unhappy memories and the lightness borne by happiness recalled.”

This debut has already received high praise:

‘Painterly… lush dreamy prose creates a vivid landscape, while its lyricism transports the reader. Cleverly creates a universe of new realities.’ Cathryn Summerhayes

‘A beautifully controlled mix of magical realism and nature writing about time, healing, trauma and the fluid, unreliable nature of memory.’ David Lloyd, co-judge of the New Welsh Writing Awards 2017

Cath’s novella is available for order HERE.

Check back for Nancy’s fascinating interview with Cath on Monday!